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Introduction

Self

Introduction

Self

5 Groupings

Sunken Cost Fallacy

Introduction

Authority

Introduction

Impact Bias

Introduction

Scarcity Bias

Introduction

Status Quo Bias

Introduction

Self

Conclusion

Stability Biases

Personalized guidance report

Stability biases, a subset of cognitive biases, are innate tendencies to create stability amid uncertainty. Developing an awareness of your biases brings them to the forefront of your thinking and is the first step toward change. Working to overcome your biases will help you improve your decision-making and problem-solving, enhance your relationships, and treat people more fairly.

Based on your responses, the following graphic reveals insights about your tendency to create stability in uncertainty.

Tip :

Hover on any of the graph to get detailed information about each factor.

Click on any of the graph to get detailed information about each factor.

The stability bias is one of six groupings of cognitive biases:

Scarcity Bias

Our fear and anxiety about the threat of missing out triggers us into action, making us more vulnerable to temptation and impulse.

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Understanding others

The Scarcity bias might influence other people more or less than you. Understanding other individuals' bias levels will help promote constructive conversations with them.

 

  • Individuals strongly influenced by this bias fear losing out on information by not keeping up with family, friends, colleagues, or current affairs. This bias can make them anxious and make hasty, ill-considered decisions. Awareness of this bias can help make better decisions by preventing the impulse or temptation to make hasty decisions.

  • Individuals moderately influenced by this bias sometimes, but not always, worry when there is a possibility of losing out on information, not staying up-to-date with current affairs, or not being in touch with what is happening here and now.

  • Individuals free of this bias do not make rash decisions based on the fear of missing out on information about family, friends, colleagues, or current affairs. They can stay calm in the absence of information, practice self-control and make well-considered decisions.

Status Quo Bias

We prefer consistency over change, so we assess the potential loss of leaving the status quo more heavily than the potential gain of trying something new.

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Understanding others

The Status Quo bias might influence others more or less than you. Understanding other individuals' bias levels will help promote constructive conversations with them.

 

  • Individuals strongly influenced by this bias prefer a stable and predictable life over an exciting and ever-changing life. When faced with opportunities that could make a huge difference, they would rather maintain the status quo than face the ups and downs that the change would bring. Awareness of this bias would help them make decisions that are more balanced and open to calculated risks.

  • Individuals moderately influenced by this bias like a stable and balanced life. However, they do not always prefer the status quo and may sometimes choose to take a new opportunity.

  • Individuals free of this bias welcome opportunities to start afresh. They do not hold on to the status quo as it does not give them a sense of comfort. Instead, they seek to lead an exciting, ever-changing life.

Your Personalized Guidance

We've analyzed your responses to the questionnaire and created personalized guidance for the five biases contributing to your Stability Biases.
Read on to learn more!

Sunken Cost Fallacy

We continue to pursue an idea or project in which we have already invested.

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Understanding others

The Sunken Cost Fallacy bias might influence others more or less than you. Understanding other individuals' bias levels will help promote constructive conversations with them.

 

  • Individuals strongly influenced by this bias would not make changes because they think they are too deeply involved in something to back out or make changes even when they realize it is a lost cause. This bias severely impairs their perception of people and situations, causing them to accept bad conditions and make poor decisions. Awareness of this bias will help them objectively evaluate people and situations to make sound decisions.

  • Individuals moderately influenced by this bias are afraid to make changes because they believe they are already too involved to back out or make changes, even when they realize it is a lost cause. However, this bias doesn't always impact their decisions, and awareness of it will help them reevaluate a potential change of course when they find themselves thinking like this.

  • Individuals free of this bias can view people and situations objectively regardless of how much effort they have invested into a project or relationship. They do not succumb to the thought that they are too invested in a project or relationship to back out. Instead, they will likely visualize how things might play out and decide accordingly. They can reevaluate their perceptions about people and situations and make sound decisions.

Authority

We inherently trust figures of authority.

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Understanding others

The Authority Effect influences other people more or less than you. Understanding other individuals' bias levels will help promote constructive conversations with them.

 

  • Individuals strongly influenced by this bias rely on the influence of leaders' and experts' opinions while making decisions. They are likely to follow their advice and refrain from doing their own research or seeking other sources. This bias encourages them to trust authority figures completely. Awareness of this bias will help them overcome the shadow/halo effect of the people they hold in high esteem and make decisions based on their independent thoughts.

  • Individuals moderately influenced by this bias tend to rely on leaders' and experts' opinions while making decisions. They usually, but not always, follow advice and refrain from doing their own research. Awareness of this bias will help them reevaluate how they seek information to make decisions.

  • Leaders and Individuals free of this bias do not rely on leaders and experts. They would rather find their own answers and do their own research to understand issues and arrive at conclusions. They would rather have data to back their decisions than follow a leader's opinion.

Impact Bias

We overestimate the intensity of how we will feel about future events.

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Understanding others

The Impact bias might influence other people more or less than you. Understanding other individuals' bias levels will help promote constructive conversations with them.

 

  • Individuals strongly influenced by this bias avoid making changes because they fear losing what they already have. This bias makes them believe it would be painful to leave behind what they already have and that they may not find anything equivalent in a new place or the future. Awareness of this bias will help them make better decisions, especially those that include some risk and offer new opportunities.

  • Individuals moderately influenced by this bias tend to avoid making changes because they fear losing what they already have. However, they may not always feel driven to make decisions based on this fear.

  • Individuals free of this bias are open to and excited about new opportunities. They do not allow the fear of the unknown to compel them to stay with the familiar or status quo. They view any new opportunity as a refreshing change that will likely be lucrative and joyful.

Talent Transformation also provides worksheets to help you work on your biases and improve your decision-making, problem-solving, relationships, and fairness.

Conclusion

Cognitive biases are innate. However, developing an awareness of your biases brings them to the forefront of your thinking and is the first step toward change. Overcoming your biases will help you improve your decision-making and problem-solving. It will also enhance your relationships and help you treat people fairly.

This guidance derives from your responses to the quiz on Stability Biases, one of six cognitive biases groupings:

Action-oriented biases:

Drive us to take action less thoughtfully than we should.

Interest biases:

Arise in the presence of conflicting incentives, including non-monetary and even purely emotional ones.

Pattern recognition biases:

Lead us to recognize patterns and sometimes imagine them even where none exist.

Stability biases:

Create a tendency toward inertia in the presence of uncertainty.

Stability biases:

Current Quiz
Social biases:

Arise from the preference for harmony over conflict

Self-related biases:

Cause us to judge ourselves differently than we understand and judge others.

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