Eight in 10 employees are dissatisfied with their jobs, and seven in 10 feel that the influx of technology is adding to job dissatisfaction, finds a TimesJobs survey of over 1,100 working professionals. 

THE NEED FOR CAREER GUIDANCE

Reviewing the results of your Career Interest Assessment is an essential first step in charting your professional path. The report is aimed at helping you make decisions on learning, training and work opportunities. What’s next? Consider career counseling to help you navigate today’s constantly evolving world of work.  The COVID-19 pandemic has underscored the importance of getting sound advice and reliable information from career guidance counselors as many individuals face job losses or need to and identify suitable career options in a profoundly changed labor market.

 

As the pandemic has accelerated adoption of digital technologies and automation increases the demand for high-level skills, career guidance can help you identify new job opportunities, learn about relevant training, and discover re-employment opportunities.

 

Guidance and counselling is not only important in the school setting, it is also important for young people who are seeking further education, training and employment. Guidance should assist young people as they navigate through education, training and in pursuit of employment. The transition from study to work can be “make-or-break” for anyone. Taking too long to secure a job can lead to financial hardships and loss of confidence that is hard to overcome—both for new entrants to the labor market and for more experienced workers who are changing jobs.

INTRODUCTION
BETTER OUTCOMES

High-quality career guidance has the potential to improve employment, education,and training outcomes.It also can mitigate skills shortages, smooth the business cycle by facilitating structural adjustment, and boost productivity by connecting adults with education and training opportunities.

 

Individuals have different guidance needs, requiring different resources and tools. The variable nature of career guidance services makes it difficult to define what constitutes high-quality service.

 

Successful engagement of young people in the labor market and society is crucial not only for their own personal economic prospects and well-being, but also for overall economic growth and social cohesion. The economic crisis as a result of the Covid-19 pandemic highlights the urgency to give all young people the support they need and reinforce their confidence in their future prospects.

CAREER READINESS IN THE PANDEMIC

Young people often face barriers in securing good work. They have lesser experience and fewer useful contacts than older people in their search for work. In 2019, young people under 25 were 2.5 times more likely to be unemployed than older people.

38% of low achievers have career ambitions that do not align with their education plans.

Only half of the students have spoken to career guidance counselors.

Young people with clear, high and considered job ambitions can be expected to do better in their work later on as they are building the agency needed for their transition.

Students chances of a successful future is greatly enhanced if they are thinking seriously about their future and share those thoughts with guidance counselors and other adults as they progress through education

FUTURE IMPLICATIONS

Everyone has likes and dislikes — more so in the professional work space. But without exposure to a broad set of occupational experiences, which is uncommon, how can we make informed career decisions? How do our interests / preferences relate to the world of work?

For more than 80 years, vocational interest inventories have been recognized as valuable tools for addressing these questions. Although reasons for completing an interest inventory vary, most people want to identify occupational fields or occupations that match their preferences.

Mid-Career
EXPLOR - CAREER INTEREST ASSESSMENT

The Career Interest Assessment (Mid-Career) is intended for experienced individuals looking for career replanning. Its purpose is to identify personally relevant career (educational and occupational) options. People can see the connections between the work world and the common, everyday things they like to do. Extensive information about the assessment - including development, norms, and supporting research, is available in the TTG Career Interest Assessment Technical Manual (TTG, 2021)

Sub-Traits Interest Scale

The Sub-traits Interest Scale represents specific sub-interest areas that often point to work activities, projects, course work, and leisure activities that are personally motivating and rewarding. Your top sub-interest areas were determined by the responses you gave to the questionnaire presented. As you review your results in the charts below, note your top interest areas and your areas of least interest, and think about how they relate to your work, educational, and leisure activities. Take time to consider any top interest areas that are not currently part of your work or lifestyle and think about how you might be able to incorporate them into your plans.

The following tables provide you with a detailed understanding of each of these six interest areas. Each of these six interest areas have 5 sub-traits each.

 

The following table will help you identify the specific area of interest. Look at the tables to understand more. Each table provides the definitions of each of the interest areas for your reference. 

The CIA provides scores for the six interest areas - EXPLOR. These interest scales parallel the well-known interest/career types described in John Holland’s theory of careers. Holland’s greatest contribution and his most renowned work pertains to his theory1 of vocational personalities and work environments. Understanding Holland’s theory will help you use your results and thereby identify careers and education programs that fit who you are and put you on a positive career path. The theory’s core idea is that most people reflect a combination of six personality types: Realistic, Investigative, Artistic, Social, Enterprising, and Conventional (commonly abbreviated with the acronym RIASEC).

 

Talent Transformation’s EXPLOR is based on RIASEC and the comparison is given below.

R (Realistic)-----------E (Experiential)

I (Investigative)------X (eXperimental)

A (Artistic)------------O (Original)

S (Social)--------------P (People)

E (Enterprising)------L (Lead)

C(Conventional)----R (Rule Following)

Each personality type is characterized by a constellation of interests, preferred activities, beliefs, abilities, values, and characteristics. A Holland code (typically the first letters of the three RIASEC types the person most reflects) can be generated from the assessment results and all six types can be rank ordered to reflect individuals’ preferences. In addition to identifying individual interests, the RIASEC model can correspond to six work environments.

Each personality type is characterized by a constellation of interests, preferred activities, beliefs, abilities, values, and characteristics. A Holland code (typically the first letters of the three RIASEC types the person most reflects) can be generated from the assessment results and all six types can be rank ordered to reflect individuals’ preferences. In addition to identifying individual interests, the RIASEC model can correspond to six work environments.

Understanding Holland’s interest codes and work environments, individuals can figure out where they can best achieve job satisfaction and success. They will thrive best in environments that align with their interest areas.

The RIASEC personality and environment types and their relationships to each other provide the basis for several testable hypotheses. The most important of these is Holland’s assertion that individuals search for and enter work environments that permit them to “exercise their skills and abilities, express their attitudes and values, and take on agreeable problems and roles” Accordingly, congruence—the degree of fit between an individual’s personality type and the work environment type—is thought to determine several important outcomes, including job satisfaction, stability, and performance. Holland proposed representing the relationships among the six areas with a hexagon2. According to Holland’s theory, the hexagonal arrangement reflects the degree of resemblance between the types. For example, types that are adjacent on the hexagon resemble each other most, and types that are on opposite sides of the hexagon resemble each other least:

To understand the RIASEC model in detail, it is important to understand these three constructs (1973, 1985, 1997c)

a) Consistency, a measure of the overlap or internal coherence of an individual’ s or environment’ s type scores, is represented by greater proximity on the hexagon.

b) Differentiation, or the degree to which a person or environment clearly resembles some RIASEC types and not others, reflects greater clarity in making vocational 26 S choices.

c) Identity, refers to the degree to which an individual has a clear “picture of one’s goals, interests, and talents”. Regarding environments, Identity is the degree to which a work setting has clear goals, tasks, and rewards that remain stable over time. Consistent and well-differentiated individuals should have more crystallized vocational identities. They are expected to make career choices with less difficulty and to “do competent work, be satisfied and personally effective, and engage in appropriate social and educational behavior”. Likewise, environments characterized by a high degree of consistency and differentiation and that possess a clear identity are expected to have employees with higher levels of satisfaction, stability, and productivity. Assessing clients’ RIASEC personality types would be of limited value without a corresponding way to link them to congruent environments. realising this, Holland developed code classifications for environments. Along with colleagues, Holland helped to develop materials for classifying occupations using the RIASEC types, first by characterizing the people who work in them3 and later by using job-analysis data4. The best—known publication resulting from this work, is the Dictionary of Holland Occupational Codes (DHOC)5. This dictionary helps clients explore occupations, academic majors, and hobbies that align with their personalities.

References for Holland’s theory

• Killeen, J. and J. Kidd (1991), Learning outcomes of guidance: a review of recent research, Department of Employment; National Institute of Careers Education and Counselling (Great Britain), http://hdl.voced.edu.au/10707/78443 (accessed on 19 November 2020).

• Bimrose, J., S. Barnes and D. Hughes (2009), Adult career progression and advancement: a five year study of the effectiveness of guidance, University of Warwick. Institute for Employment Research (IER), Coventry, England, http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/soc/ier/publications/2008/ eg_report_4_years_on_final.pdf (accessed on 19 November 2020)

• Maguire, M. (2004), “Measuring the Outcomes of Career Guidance”, International Journal for Educational and Vocational Guidance, Vol. 4/2-3, pp. 179-192, http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10775-005-1022-1

• Kidd, J., C. Jackson and W. Hirsh (2003), “The outcomes of effective career discussion at work”, Journal of Vocational Behavior, Vol. 62/1, pp. 119-133, http:// dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0001-8791(02)00027-1.

• Bimrose, J., S. Barnes and D. Hughes (2009), Adult career progression and advancement: a five year study of the effectiveness of guidance, University of Warwick. Institute for Employment Research (IER), Coventry, England, http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/soc/ier/publications/2008/ eg_report_4_years_on_final.pdf (accessed on 19 November 2020).

• European Commission (2015), An in-depth analysis of adult learning policies and their effectiveness in Europe, Directorate General for Employment, Social Affairs and Inclusion, https://op.europa.eu/en/publication-detail/-/publication/c8c38dc9-89d0-11e5-b8b7-01aa75ed71a1/language-en (accessed on 6 November 2020).

• Lane, M. et al. (2017), An economic evaluation of the National Careers Service, Department for Education, London, https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/ government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/603929/National_Careers_Service_economic_evaluation.pdf (accessed on 6 August 2020).

• Killeen, J. and M. White (2000), The Impact of Careers Guidance on Adult Employed People, Department for Education and Employment, London.

• Card, D., J. Kluve and A. Weber (2015), What Works? A Meta Analysis of Recent Active Labor Market Program Evaluations, Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit Institute for the Study of Labor.

• OECD 2020 Survey of Career Guidance for Adults (SCGA).

References for Holland’s theory

1. Holland, J. L. (1959). A theory of vocational choice. Journal of Counseling Psychology, 6, 35–45.

2. Holland, J. L. (1966b). The psychology of vocational choice: A theory of personality type and model environments. Waltham, MA: Blaisdell.

3. Holland, J. L. (1973). Making vocational choices. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall.

4. Holland, J. L. (1985). Making vocational choices: A theory of vocational personalities and work environments. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall.

5. Holland, J. L. (1997c). Making vocational choices: A theory of vocational personalities and work environments (3rd ed.). Odessa, FL: Psychological Assessment Resources.

6. Holland, J. L., Whitney, D. R., Cole, N. S., & Richards, J. M. (1969). An empirical occupational classification derived from a theory of person- ality and intended for practice and research (ACT Research Report No. 29). Iowa City, IA: American College Testing Program.

6. Holland, J. L., Whitney, D. R., Cole, N. S., & Richards, J. M. (1969). An empirical occupational classification derived from a theory of person- ality and intended for practice and research (ACT Research Report No. 29). Iowa City, IA: American College Testing Program.

7. Campbell, D. P., & Holland, J. L. (1972). A merger in vocational interest research: Applying Holland’s theory to Strong’s data. Journal of Vocational Behavior, 2, 353–376.

8. Holland, J. L. (1966a). A psychological classification scheme for vocations and major fields. Journal of Counseling Psychology, 13, 278–288. 9. Holland, J. L. (1975). Manual for the Vocational Preference Inventory. Palo Alto, CA: Consulting Psychologists Press.

10. Holland, J. L. (1978). The Occupations Finder. Odessa, FL: Psychological Assessment Resources.

11. Gottfredson, G. D., & Holland, J. L. (1996). Dictionary of Holland occupational codes (3rd ed.). Odessa, FL: Psychological Assessment Resources.

• Killeen, J. and J. Kidd (1991), Learning outcomes of guidance: a review of recent research, Department of Employment; National Institute of Careers Education 
and Counselling (Great Britain), http://hdl.voced.edu.au/10707/78443 (accessed on 19 November 2020).


• Bimrose, J., S. Barnes and D. Hughes (2009), Adult career progression and advancement: a five year study of the effectiveness of guidance, University of 
Warwick. Institute for Employment Research (IER), Coventry, England, http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/soc/ier/publications/2008/
eg_report_4_years_on_final.pdf (accessed on 19 November 2020)


• Maguire, M. (2004), “Measuring the Outcomes of Career Guidance”, International Journal for Educational and Vocational Guidance, Vol. 4/2-3, pp. 179-192, 
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10775-005-1022-1


• Kidd, J., C. Jackson and W. Hirsh (2003), “The outcomes of effective career discussion at work”, Journal of Vocational Behavior, Vol. 62/1, pp. 119-133, http://
dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0001-8791(02)00027-1.


• Bimrose, J., S. Barnes and D. Hughes (2009), Adult career progression and advancement: a five year study of the effectiveness of guidance, University of 
Warwick. Institute for Employment Research (IER), Coventry, England, http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/soc/ier/publications/2008/
eg_report_4_years_on_final.pdf (accessed on 19 November 2020).


• European Commission (2015), An in-depth analysis of adult learning policies and their effectiveness in Europe, Directorate General for Employment, Social 
Affairs and Inclusion, https://op.europa.eu/en/publication-detail/-/publication/c8c38dc9-89d0-11e5-b8b7-01aa75ed71a1/language-en (accessed on 
6 November 2020).


• Lane, M. et al. (2017), An economic evaluation of the National Careers Service, Department for Education, London, https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/
government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/603929/National_Careers_Service_economic_evaluation.pdf (accessed on 6 August 2020).


• Killeen, J. and M. White (2000), The Impact of Careers Guidance on Adult Employed People, Department for Education and Employment, London.


• Card, D., J. Kluve and A. Weber (2015), What Works? A Meta Analysis of Recent Active Labor Market Program Evaluations, Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der 
Arbeit Institute for the Study of Labor.


• OECD 2020 Survey of Career Guidance for Adults (SCGA).

REFERENCES FOR INTRODUCTION
HOLLAND’S THEORY AND EXPLOR
RECOMENDATIONS

REPORT RESULTS

CAREER GUIDANCE - YOUNG ADULTS

Are you considering a career change? Your CIA results can help you discover more alternatives than you might have imagined and help you identify a vocational environment in which you will thrive best.

 

Please note that a CIA is just one vital resource. Skills tests, personality assessments and other resources also play essential roles in guiding people to make the right career decisions.

Career Interest Assessments (CIAs) give individuals tools for evaluating and reflecting upon their career paths and choices. These assessments help people identify career interests and potential jobs.

 

You can use your EXPLOR Career Interest Assessment results to help you make crucial decisions. You may want to change your career path, find a new job in the same field, or restructure your current job to make it more satisfying. These assessments can help you at every stage of your life, from your first job search to career changes, promotions, and even the activities you pursue in your later years. They can help you understand your vocational interests in depth and use this knowledge to make satisfying decisions about your career and future learning.

EXPLOR — Career Interest Assessment

HOW THIS REPORT IS ORGANIZED

Section 1 - Six Interest Themes Describes the interests, associated values, associated skills, and potential job profiles.

Section 2 - Your report i)Your scores on the Interest areas and ii) the Sub-traits Interest Scale Section 3 - Holland’s theory and EXPLOR

HOW YOU WILL BENEFIT FROM THIS REPORT

This report will help you identify your vocational interests, which in turn will help you - Achieve job satisfaction Use interests in shaping your career direction Decide on your focus for the future Direct your own career exploration Identify career options consistent with your interests

As you review your results in the charts/table below, note your top interest areas and your areas of least interest, and think about how they relate to your work, educational, and leisure activities. Take time to consider any top interest areas that are not currently part of your work or lifestyle and think about how you might incorporate them into your work.

The Interest Scale / Career Interest Assessment represents specific interest areas that often point to work activities, projects, course work, and leisure activities that are personally motivating and rewarding. Your top interest areas and your levels of interest levels on the sub-traits (very high, high, medium, low, and very low) were determined by the responses you gave to the questionnaire.

THE SIX INTEREST THEMES

C. Employment

• In a meta-analysis of evaluations of active labor market program, Card, Kluve and Weber (2015) found that job search assistance (which included guidance as a component) increases the probability of employment in the short-run and is more cost-effective than other active labour market programs (i.e., training, private sector incentives, public employment). 5 SAMPLE REPORT Talent Transformation Guild Career Interest Assessment Profile

• The impact on the long-term probability of employment is small. According to the SCGA (OECD 2020 Survey of Career Guidance for Adults (SCGA).

• The majority (70%) of individuals report some change to their employment or training status in the six months after receiving career guidance.

• A quarter (25%) of individuals made progress in their job (e.g., obtained a promotion), while 19% enrolled in an education or training program.

• The next most common change was moving to a new job in the same industry (17%), followed by moving to a new job in a different industry (16%).

• In Italy and Germany, users were least likely to report any change to their employment and training status.

• Adults in Chile were more likely to report making progress in their job or enrolling in an education or training programme.

• Adults in the United States were more likely to move to a different job in either the same industry or a different one. • Three-quarters (75%) of adults who receive career guidance report being satisfied or very satisfied with the guidance they receive.

A. Learning & Skills

Empirical evidence shows that career guidance can:

• Positively impact short-term learning outcomes such as decision-making skills, information-seeking skills, self-awareness, and job search skills (Killeen and Kidd, 1991); Bimrose, (Barnes and Hughes, 2009); Maguire, 2004; Kidd, Jackson and Hirsh, 2003).

• Increase confidence and motivation (Bimrose, Barnes and Hughes, 2009) and

• improve adults’ attitudes toward learning (European Commission, 2015).

B. Training participation

• There is evidence that adults who voluntarily seek guidance are more likely to participate in education and training than similar adults who do not. Several impact evaluations of publicly funded career guidance for adults in the United Kingdom found a significant impact of guidance on participation in education or training (Lane et al., 2017; Killeen and White, 2000).  

EMPIRICAL EVIDENCE TO SUPPORT THE POSITIVE IMPACT OF CAREER GUIDANCE IN ADULTHOOD

Choosing a career path, making a career decision, or deciding on future learning - all are critical decisions. They demand high-quality decision making. This interest report attempts to provide with an in-depth understanding of your vocational interests to help you focus throughout work, leisure, and academic interests. Find out as much as you can about occupations, career fields, leisure activities, and academic interests with codes similar to those of your Top Interest Codes. The table below lists your top and least areas of interest.

SCORES AND INTERPRETATION

Experiential

People who like to hands-on activities and work with things, plants and animals. They tend to be interested in activities requiring motor coordination, skill and strength. They approach problem solving by doing something, rather than talking about it, or sitting and thinking about it. They are practical rather than abstract. Finally, their interests tend to focus on scientific, practical / doable or mechanical rather than cultural and aesthetic areas. They see themselves as practical, mechan

eXperimental

People who prefer to work with ideas and are curious. They like to study and solve math or science problems. They like to think and observe rather than act. They aim to solve problems by understanding information. They also prefer individual rather than people oriented activities. They see themselves as precise, scientific, and intellectual.

Original

People who like to be creative, open, inventive, original, perceptive, sensitive, independent and emotional. They rebel against 
structure and rules, but enjoy tasks involving people or physical skills. They tend to be more emotional than the other types. They see 
themselves as expressive, original, and independent.

People

People who like to work with people and who find satisfaction in teaching or helping others. They like to help people and solve 
social problems. They tend to be seek close relationships and are often less interested in leading. They see themselves as helpful, friendly, 
and trustworthy.

Lead

People who like to work with others. They tend to be good at presenting ideas, and are drawn to leading or persuading others.

They also value reputation, power, money and status. They see themselves as energetic, ambitious, and sociable.

Rule Following

People who like to be creative, open, inventive, original, perceptive, sensitive, independent and emotional. They rebel against structure and rules, but then enjoy tasks involving people or physical skills. They tend to be more emotional than the other types. They see themselves as expressive, original, and independent.

- Recommended Careers

CAREERS BY INTERESTS