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Introduction

Self

Introduction

Self

5 Groupings

Social Proof Bias

Introduction

Identifiable Victim
Effect

Introduction

Belonging Bias

Introduction

Group Think Bias

Introduction

Community Bias

Introduction

Self

Conclusion

Social biases

Personalized guidance report

Social biases, a grouping of cognitive biases, arise from the preference for harmony over conflict. Developing an awareness of your biases brings them to the forefront of your thinking and is the first step toward change. Overcoming your biases will help you improve your decision-making and problem-solving. It will also enhance your relationships and help you treat people fairly.

The following graphic reflects your responses and reveals your tendency toward harmony over conflict.

Tip :

Hover on any of the graph to get detailed information about each factor.

Click on any of the graph to get detailed information about each factor.

Pattern recognition is one of six groupings of cognitive biases:

Group Think Bias

A common desire not to upset a group’s dynamics causes members to reach a consensus without critically thinking and evaluating consequences or alternatives.

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Understanding others

The Group Think bias might influence others more or less than you. Understanding other individuals’ bias levels will help promote constructive conversations with them.

 

  • Individuals strongly influenced by this bias like to conform to group decisions, and they are most comfortable when everyone agrees on a thought, idea, or decision. This bias is a barrier to reaching the right decision, giving primary importance to group consensus rather than a critical evaluation of options. Awareness of this bias will help individuals be objective and focus on arriving at the right decision instead of maintaining group harmony.

  • Individuals moderately influenced by this bias might conform to group decisions. They are comfortable when everyone agrees on a thought, idea, or decision. However, they do not always approach problems in this way. Sometimes they can focus on making the right decision instead of maintaining group harmony.

  • Individuals free of this bias focus on making the right decision instead of always maintaining group harmony. They value the group’s ideas but can critically evaluate the group’s consensus to determine if it is right. They will likely encourage everyone to give their opinion rather than try to arrive at a unanimous decision.

Community Bias

Being around people who share our goals and interests makes us feel more secure, builds our self-esteem, and enhances our confidence.

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Understanding others

The Community bias might influence others more or less than you. Understanding other individuals’ bias levels will help promote constructive conversations with them.

 

  • Individuals strongly influenced by this bias find that a major part of their identity is the community they belong to. They base most of their decisions on the community’s rules and feel safe and secure among people with similar cultural backgrounds. This bias can cause people to let their community influence them so much that they reject outside influences that could benefit them. Awareness of this bias can help you feel motivated, safe, and confident while becoming more open to others and stepping out into the wider world.

  • Individuals moderately influenced by this bias will most likely draw confidence and inspiration from their community. However, they do not always align with their principles. They can sometimes be open to others and feel inspired by those not part of their community.

  • Individuals free of this bias are open to people outside your community. They can step out into the wider world and feel psychologically safe. They do not necessarily draw inspiration and motivation solely from their community or base their decisions on its assumptions. They are likely to think that the world is their oyster.

Your Personalized Guidance

We've analyzed your responses to the questionnaire and created personalized guidance for the five biases contributing to your Social Biases.
Read on to learn more!

Social Proof Bias

When someone like us approves of a product or service, we will trust it more and feel an increased desire to use it too.

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Understanding others

The Social Proof bias might influence others more or less than you. Understanding other individuals’ bias levels will help promote constructive conversations with them.

 

  • Individuals strongly influenced by this bias are likelier to agree with an idea or buy a product when their friends, peers, colleagues, family, an influencer, or society at large endorse it. They trust the opinion of others and make decisions based on what they see as social proof. This bias can impair their decision-making ability, and awareness of it will help them make decisions not driven by what others endorse.

  • Individuals not completely influenced by this bias tend to agree with an idea or buy a product when their friends, peers, colleagues, family, an influencer, or society at large endorse it. However, they do not always make decisions based on social proof.

  • Individuals free of this bias make decisions based on their own thoughts. They do not seek social support or adhere to others’ opinions. They can make bold decisions and stand out from the group if it serves their cause.

Identifiable Victim Effect

We empathize more with a specific individual than a large, anonymous group.

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Understanding others

The Identifiable Victim bias might influence others more or less than you. Understanding other individuals’ bias levels will help promote constructive conversations with them.

 

  • Individuals strongly influenced by this bias help people they know rather than strangers, even if strangers approach them about a good cause. They are not as comfortable or trusting of charities and other good causes as they are of friends and acquaintances. Awareness of this bias will help them consider helping strangers and learning about potentially good causes.

  • Individuals moderately influenced by this bias usually but not always tend to help people they know more than you would strangers. They may sometimes be open to an approach by a stranger representing a charity or other well-meaning organization.

  • Individuals free of this bias are equally open to helping people they know and strangers representing charities and other good causes. They equally trust or distrust groups and individuals when it comes to charity.

Belonging Bias

To conform, we change our opinions, decisions, beliefs, and ideas according to the number of people who think in a particular way.

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Understanding others

The Belonging bias might influence others more or less than you. Understanding other individuals’ bias levels will help promote constructive conversations with them.

 

  • Individuals strongly influenced by this bias enjoy being part of a group (friends, family, colleagues, peers). They like participating in activities the group endorses and play along with what the group decides to do. Being part of the group makes them feel safe and believe they are doing the right thing. This bias makes people think the group knows best. Awareness of this bias will help individuals regulate it to help discover their individuality, respect their personal choices, and make decisions accordingly.

  • Individuals moderately influenced by this bias tend to enjoy being part of a group (friends, family, peers). They usually, but not always, play along with what the group decides to do. They will likely feel they are doing the right thing when they are in the group. Thinking independently and making decisions based on their perception is also something they consider at times.

  • Individuals free of this bias think about the actions they want to take regardless of what the group decides. They have no desire to belong to a group or cult. Instead, they think independently and make decisions based on their perception of the situation and analysis of the facts.

Talent Transformation has also developed worksheets to help you work on your biases to help you improve your decision-making, problem-solving, relationships, and sense of fairness.

Conclusion

Cognitive biases are innate. However, developing an awareness of your biases brings them to the forefront of your thinking and is the first step toward change. Overcoming your biases will help you improve your decision-making and problem-solving. It will also enhance your relationships and help you treat people fairly.

This guidance was based on your responses to the quiz on social biases, one of six different grouping of cognitive biases:

Action-oriented biases:

Drive us to take action less thoughtfully than we should.

Interest biases:

Arise in the presence of conflicting incentives, including non-monetary and even purely emotional ones.

Pattern recognition biases:

Lead us to recognize patterns and sometimes imagine them even where none exist.

Stability biases:

Create a tendency toward inertia in the presence of uncertainty.

Social biases:

Arise from the preference for harmony over conflict

Social biases:

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Self-related biases:

Cause us to judge ourselves differently than we understand and judge others.

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