How To Build Organizational Competence

8 Mar 2021 11:01 AM | Anonymous member (Administrator)


Competency frameworks, sometimes referred to as competency models, act as guides for governments, schools, colleges, universities, employers, students, employees, and job seekers. Industry-specific competency frameworks are produced by government agencies and trade groups to provide a starting point for the other stakeholders. Competency frameworks are formulated for different industry sectors, roles, jobs, careers, or job groups. By expressing the specific skills and knowledge requirements of an industry, they create the roadmap for career growth. Organizations then use these industry frameworks to produce their versions of the framework. These frameworks help us clearly express the behaviors, capabilities, knowledge, skills, and abilities required for jobs. Job seekers can prepare themselves for their industry of choice by using publicly available competency frameworks. Learning and development content creators can use these frameworks to create relevant training courses. Industry competency frameworks also inform the competencies required for licenses, credentials, and certifications. Employees can upskill to be up-to-date with industry expectations for their role.

Macro View

As the diagram below shows a competency framework brings many uses and benefits.


National and regional government use industry frameworks to inform their policy and funding decisions. Schools, colleges and universities use frameworks to drive curricular and the competencies required to win a credential. As stakeholder Awarding bodies are key. Awarding bodies are also known as test publishers or certification authorities. Awarding bodies use frameworks to define the competencies requires for the certification programs that might be used to documents qualifications and grant credentials.

Competency frameworks underpin critical HR functions such as writing job descriptions, recruiting, interviewing candidates, learning programs, employee development, performance management, selection, promotion, upskilling, certification, and so on.

Finally, individuals use competency frameworks to inform their career choices.

Competency frameworks are dynamic

Competency frameworks are not stagnant management frameworks. Industry and business experts regularly update these frameworks based on economic, business, and technology changes. Competency frameworks must remain current to inform stakeholders. Industry competency frameworks provide governments, and regional economies, insights into trends to develop strategies, policies, and funding to grow the talent pool required for prosperity.

A Competency Framework is a collection of defined competencies is known as a competency framework. A competency describes what an individual should know and do to perform a specific role or a task. These are used to define one or more job roles within an industry or a particular organization.

Behaviors vs. Capabilities

Competence describes an individual’s ability to perform a specific task or activity successfully within a predefined situation. There are two broad categories of competencies; behaviors define how an individual should behave, and capabilities represent what an individual should know or be able to do.

The actual number of behavioral competencies referenced with a competency framework varies from organization to organization but is in the order of 4 to 15.

Capabilities define knowledge, skills, and abilities that an individual must be able to use to complete a task successfully. Sometimes granular levels of details define capabilities, and in some frameworks, only high-level definitions are documented. The number of capabilities referenced with a competency framework can range from tens to hundreds.

Competency definitions serve as a standard to assess and measure performance via differentiating levels such as “Needs Improvement or Support”, “Meets Expectation”, and “Exceeds Expectation.” Combining all of these thoughts a well-defined competency could be represented as:


Defining a Behavioral Competency

While a competency definition may assume many forms, they always have some shared elements such as the “Competency Name” and “Competency Definition.” For example, a behavioral competency:

Competency Name: Teamwork

Competency Definition: To be able to complete tasks while coordinating and collaborating with others

Each competency will have a list of desired behaviors outlining the desired abilities and assessment criteria. For example, the desired list of activities for teamwork might be:

  • Staying committed toward the teams’ goals.
  • Facilitating team interaction.
  • Focusing on teams’ goals.
  • Ability to delegate and utilizing each other’s strengths to complete tasks.
  • Mitigating weaknesses by collaborating.
  • Handling conflicts effectively.
  • Staying open to group opinions and suggestions.
  • Motivating group members to submit ideas.
  • Supporting and following group decisions.
  • Effective handling of work-style differences.

Competency definitions also contain information regarding the level of mastery required at different organizational and occupational standards. They inform the abilities to be demonstrated to achieve each level of competence. Such information helps create learning and development content and performance measurement.

Defining a Capability Competency

A capability competence establishes the knowledge, skills, and abilities to perform a task. Just as with a behavioral competency, these competency definitions also have a “Competency Name” and “Competency Definition.” For example, a capability competency:

Competency Name: Install and Configure a Framework XL Router

Competency Definition: Given a functioning Framework XL Router install it within a 19” rack and configure for route IP traffic securely on an internal network

For this capability, a list of tasks would be specified, for example:

  • Determine that the work area is safe.
  • Determine if the new router is to be installed in a “hot” or “cold” rack.
  • Take the necessary precautions if the router is to be installed in a hot rack.
  • Install the router into the rack safely and securely.
  • Apply power to the rack and ensure that it powers up correctly.
  • Using configuration software to ensure that the router passes all internal diagnostic tests.
  • Using configuration software to configure and route IP traffic securely on an internal network.
  • Insert network cables and run security tests to ensure the router is performing correctly.

A capability competency definition will typically contain the levels which are used to measure “Needs Support”, “Meets Expectation” and “Exceeds Expectation” performances. In this example, the individual’s actual performance might be determined by a supervisor or by using virtual reality.

Effective and Targeted Learning

Competency definitions often reference the learning needs of a person who is currently below the expected performance level. By following the learning guidelines an individual can access targeted learning opportunity which allows him to upgrade himself to above expectation or meets expectation performance levels.

Competency Frameworks and Upskilling

Individuals today must continuously upgrade their skills, adapt to, and learn to stay relevant in the job market and provide the necessary skills organizations need to remain in operation. This constant need for improvement is driven by competition at the global level, massive technological changes, and the need for environment-friendly and sustainable solutions. These factors affect the economy directly, and businesses are supporting these trends.

Under such a climate, employers, the government, and the education system are motivated to come together to perform the following critical functions:

  • Develop industry-specific and open competency frameworks.
  • Create an education system that is adaptive to the fast-changing world of business.
  • Improve access to learning opportunities for the skills required to improve income and quality of life.
  • Increase income equality and salaries.
  • Train and prepare workers for better job opportunities.
  • Allow low wage workers to upskill and find better jobs.
  • Develop capabilities and behavioral skills to allow workers to succeed in the 4th industrial revolution.

Help workers succeed in entering the emerging and fast-growing sectors such as the “alternate energy” industry.

Of course, these responsibilities go hand in hand where one cannot be achieved without the other. Unless someone documents and publishes the skillset and aptitude necessary for high-skill positions, educators would not be able to create curricula and guidance systems to prepare potential workers. Competency frameworks provide the framework for this documentation. Business and industry experts come together to develop comprehensive industry competency frameworks. These frameworks document in great detail the desired skillset for crucial economic sectors and emerging high-growth industries.

When properly formulated, these industry competency frameworks serve as reference frameworks that provide the interconnectedness between governments, academia, employers, and individuals. These frameworks allow employers to define clear job descriptions and describe the topics for upskilling. They help prepare curricula, guidelines, and assessments required to measure the behaviors and capabilities required to perform the tasks of the job. By providing information on the desired credentials and licenses needed to fulfill the competencies, the frameworks offer a clear pathway for career progression and growth

About the Talent Transformation Guild

The Talent Transformation Guild provides resources for professionals that are preparing for upskilling being triggered by 4th industrial revolution and accelerated by Covid-19. Members include c-level executives, human resource professionals, consultants, and coaches. As a member-driven organization it promotes best practices via webcasts, webinars, podcasts, articles, white papers, research and conversations to improve and make the best of the talents of individuals for the benefit of themselves and the organisations they work for.

The Guild enable stimulating and meaningful discussions to help professionals prepare for talent transformations at individual, team and organizational levels. The Guild supports the Talent Transformation Pyramid, an open source model, designed specifically to recognize the widest possible range of talent influencers and skills. To date many decision-makers are caught in traditional, linear thinking and immediate concerns to consider this. The Talent Transformation Pyramid enables you to address the challenge by promoting more strategic thinking with a focus on an organization’s readiness to perform. https://www.talenttransformation.com/

About the Future of Work

According to the World Economic Forum, new and emerging technologies are affecting our lives in ways that indicate we are at the beginning of a Fourth Industrial Revolution. This new era will build and extend the impact of digitization in new and unimaginable ways. The Fourth Industrial Revolution can be described as the advent of “cyber-physical systems” involving new capabilities for people and machines. This will see new ways for technology to become embedded within societies and even our bodies.

With process automation, robotic automation, the internet of things the nature of work will change. Some analysts predict that more than 40% of tasks currently performed by humans will be delegated to machines. This does not mean that 40% of people will be put out of work but it does mean that most workers will have to upskill. HR experts are predicting this will dramatically change the landscape of our workforce.


About the Guild's Founders

Eric Shepherd an accomplished leader of international businesses and associations focused on talent, assessments, and success. Eric recently stepped away from a CEO role where he worked to build a SaaS company into a multi-million-dollar international assessment software business. Eric has also led industry and standards initiatives to promote best practices for assessments, learning, and interoperability. He currently serves as Chair of the IEEE P1484.20.2 working group developing Recommended Practice for Defining Competencies. Eric has previously served on Boards and working groups for:

  • HR Open Standards that defines interoperability standards for HR technology.
  • Association of Test Publishers and the European Association of Test Publishers that represents providers of tests and assessment tools.
  • The IEEE P1484.20.1 Standard for Learning Technology—Data Model for Reusable Competency Definitions working group.
  • IMS which defines interoperability standards for educational technology. 

Eric was instrumental in developing the IMS QTI interoperability standard and assisted with the US Department of Defense Advanced Distributed Learning (ADL) initiative to define the Sharable Content Object Reference Model (SCORM) and the Aviation Industry Computer-Based Training Committee (AICC) to define launch and track standards for Learning Management Systems.

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