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Action-oriented Biases

Personalized guidance report

Action-oriented biases, a subset of cognitive biases, are innate tendencies to take action less thoughtfully than we should. Developing an awareness of your biases brings them to the forefront of your thinking and is the first step toward change.
 

Working to overcome your biases will help you improve your decision-making and problem-solving. It will also enhance your relationships and help you treat people more fairly.

The following graphic is based on your responses and reveals insights into your tendency to take action less thoughtfully than you should.

Tip :

Hover on any of the graph to get detailed information about each factor.

Click on any of the graph to get detailed information about each factor.

The stability bias is one of six different groupings of cognitive biases:

Trust Bias

A trusted brand, service, product, or person has the upper hand compared to something new. Trust can significantly influence our decision-making.

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Understanding others

The Trust bias might influence others more or less than you. Understanding other individuals’ bias levels will help promote constructive conversations with them.

 

  • Individuals strongly influenced by this bias tend to trust familiar brands, products, services, and people. They are influenced by what has worked before and the impressions of their past experiences. Awareness of this bias will help them make better decisions and apply caution when required.

  • Individuals moderately influenced by this bias are willing to try something new but might fall back on the familiar. They might trust people with whom they previously have interacted more than they would trust a stranger.

  • Individuals free of this bias can overcome the influence of past experiences and make objective decisions

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Likability Effect

We tend to like people who are similar to us.

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Understanding others

The Likability Effect might affect others more or less than you. Understanding other individuals’ bias levels will help promote constructive conversations with them.

 

  • Individuals strongly influenced by this bias prefer those with similar traits, habits, and interests. They tend to form strong connections with people like themselves and may notice that people close to them share their tastes, habits, and interests. This bias may inhibit them from making new connections with people who are different from themselves. Awareness of this bias will help them broaden their perspective and be more accepting of others.

  • Individuals moderately influenced by this bias prefer people like them over those who are different, although they will have friends and connections who are different from themselves. While they have strong connections with people like them, they also bond well with those with different characteristics and viewpoints.

  • Individuals free of this bias are open to interacting and forming close bonds with those different from themselves in interests, habits, and traits. They readily associate with those who are different from themselves and those with whom they share interests and viewpoints.

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Your Personalized Guidance

We've analyzed your responses to the questionnaire and created personalized guidance for the five biases contributing to your Action Oriented Biases.
Read on to learn more!

Analysis Paralysis

Our brain defaults to shutting down when presented with too many options. Overwhelmed by choices, we either postpone or completely avoid taking action.

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Understanding others

Analysis Paralysis biases might influence others more or less than you. Understanding other individuals’ bias levels will help promote constructive conversations with them.

 

  • Individuals strongly influenced by this bias indicate that they get overwhelmed and confused and find it difficult to make a decision when presented with too many options. They need some time to sort through options before arriving at a decision. Being aware of this bias will help them regulate their behaviors and mitigate the impact of this bias to help them make better decisions.

  • Individuals moderately influenced by this bias are usually not quick decision-makers. However, there are times when they can make a decision fairly quickly, and they do not always find it difficult to make a decision when presented with many options.

  • Individuals free of this bias have clarity of thought and can sort through options and choices presented to them. They can make a decision quickly without getting overwhelmed by the number of options.

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Slippery Slope

After performing a small action, we’re more likely to perform additional actions.

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Understanding others

The Slippery Slope bias might influence others more or less than you. Understanding other individuals’ bias levels will help promote constructive conversations with them.

 

  • Individuals strongly influenced by this bias get involved in causes once they initially commit to them and tend to deepen their commitment after they start participating in the activity. They may follow this pattern in personal relationships as well. This tendency may cause them to tell someone more about their feelings and thoughts after telling them a little about themselves. Being aware of this bias will help them regulate their behaviors and mitigate the impact of this bias to help them make better decisions.

  • Individuals moderately influenced by this bias may not always go deeper into initial engagements and relationships. However, this bias can sometimes influence them to become more committed to activities they have performed once or talk about personal issues with people they are already close to.

  • Individuals free of this bias do not engage or become influenced to become more committed. Actions they have taken once or activities they have pursued for a short period do not cause them to go deeper into them. When discussing personal matters, they can withhold information even with those with whom they previously have shared personal information.

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Framing Effect

We react to choices differently depending on how the choices are presented.

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Understanding others

The Framing Effect might influence others more or less than you. Understanding other individuals’ bias levels will help promote constructive conversations with them.

 

  • The presentation of objects and ideas influences individuals strongly affected by this bias. The bells, whistles, and charm surrounding products or ideas sway them more than their core value. Awareness of this bias will help them regulate their behaviors and mitigate the impact of this bias to help them make better decisions.

  • The presentation of a product or idea may sometimes influence Individuals moderately influenced by this bias. However, the presentation may not always sway them, and they sometimes may be able to look at the real value.

  • The presentation of things does not sway individuals free of this bias. They can focus realistically on products, ideas, and objects. They can evaluate an idea, product, or object without being influenced by the context, time, or how interesting or attractive it appears.

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Talent Transformation has also developed worksheets to help you develop work on your biases to help you improve your decision-making, problem-solving, relationships, and fairness.

Conclusion

Cognitive biases are innate. However, developing an awareness of your biases brings them to the forefront of your thinking and is the first step toward change. Overcoming your biases will help you improve your decision-making and problem-solving. It will also enhance your relationships and help you treat people fairly.

This guidance was based on your responses to the quiz on Stability Biases, one of six different grouping of cognitive biases:

Action-oriented biases:

Drive us to take action less thoughtfully than we should.

Action-oriented biases:

Current Quiz
Interest biases:

Arise in the presence of conflicting incentives, including non-monetary and even purely emotional ones.

Pattern recognition biases:

Lead us to recognize patterns and sometimes imagine them even where none exist.

Stability biases:

Create a tendency toward inertia in the presence of uncertainty.

Social biases:

Arise from the preference for harmony over conflict

Self-related biases:

Cause us to judge ourselves differently than we understand and judge others.

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Introduction

Self

Introduction

Self

5 Groupings

Analysis Paralysis

Introduction

Slippery Slope

Introduction

Framing Effect

Introduction

Trust Bias

Introduction

Likability Effect

Introduction

Self

Conclusion

Based on your responses we recommend:

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